NEWS » Renduchintala, Bell speak on the Future at Techonomy 2016

Renduchintala, Bell speak on the Future at Techonomy 2016

24 November 2016
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Murthy Renduchintala and Genevieve Bell, two Intel Corporation leaders, spoke Nov. 11 at the exclusive Techonomy 2016 conference in Half Moon Bay, California. Event organizers this week posted videos of their presentations: Renduchintala’s focused on the need for a federal strategy around the Internet of Things (IoT); Bell’s centered on how artificial intelligence is making machines smarter and what that means for security and privacy.

Murthy Renduchintala

Murthy Renduchintala

Venkata “Murthy” Renduchintala speaks Nov. 11, 2016, at the Techonomy 2016 conference in Half Moon Bay, California. His presentation focused on the need for a federal strategy around the Internet of Things (IoT).

Speaking on stage with Techonomy CEO David Kirkpatrick, Renduchintala, president of the Client and Internet of Things Businesses and Systems Architecture Group at Intel, said the United States has a “bit of catching up to do” when compared with other countries that are aggressively establishing national plans and blueprints with time-bound, measurable goals to capitalize on the tremendous impact of the IoT.

Video: Murthy Renduchintala at Techonomy 2016

During the discussion, “Why the U.S. Government Needs an IoT Strategy,” Renduchintala said: “You can’t talk about concepts such as autonomous driving, or, for example, drones … without having a degree of legislative involvement, but it’s really [about] how you structure that engagement. And how you make sure that legislature [talks] about policy frameworks and performance standards, as opposed to dictating a technical implementation, and allow the industry and innovative environment to really figure out what great ideas fulfill that policy framework and those performance requirements.”

Keeping a national IOT strategy atop the priorities for the incoming Congress is critical, Renduchintala said. An appropriately structured partnership between Congress and the technology industry to develop the policy framework is imperative. A national strategy, he said, should be based on a public policy framework that encourages market innovation and competition.

“The Economic opportunity here is profound and the more we can educate everybody concerned, including congress, about what can be created with the technology that we are investing large amounts of R&D on, engage them in a discussion of how they can help, and be able to define the value proposition of what would come as a result of the help is, I think, our burden,” Renduchintala said.

Genevieve Bell

Genevieve Bell

Genevieve Bell speaks Nov. 11, 2016, at the Techonomy 2016 conference in Half Moon Bay, California. Her presentation centered on how artificial intelligence is making machines smarter and what that means for security and privacy.

Also speaking at Techonomy, Bell, Intel vice president and senior fellow, joined the panel discussion “What Hello Barbie Said to Alexa and Siri.” The discussion centered on how our devices are talking back, but also how through artificial intelligence and cloud-based systems, they remember, record, transcribe and even email our conversations. The conversation asked: As personal assistants and simple play are transformed, what are the safety, security and privacy issues for adults, as well as for children?

Video: Genevieve Bell at Techonomy

“It’s important to remember this is not the first time we’ve had anxiety about toys,” Bell said. “We have had toys that talked, toys that appeared to have bodily functions, the Furby (and the anxiety that caused over whether or not it was recording). So the notion of kids and toys and anxiety is not a new thing, but this has gone from an object that appeared to be talking and making noise to listening and having a conversation, which is a significant shift.”

The panel explored how the shift is not just affecting a select audience, but everyone involved with technology. Objects and things that didn’t have a voice and now do, we need to accommodate for – and that includes the data they are collecting.

“There is an interesting problem around data persistence and how much of the data being currently collected that doesn’t have an expiration date beyond technical difficulties,” Bell said. “There is something interesting there that says the data you are producing as a 7- or 13-year-old has the potential to linger much longer than we’re used to – And who controls the data? What happens when companies owning it become other companies? And when the data co-mingles with another set? – what all of that will mean for our lives.”


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